Why Pile Driving is a Powerful First Step for Massey Bridge

June 15, 2016
Massey Bridge Pile Driving Data

If you’ve driven north on Highway 99 towards the George Massey Tunnel lately, you may have noticed a crane working on Deas Island. Crews were collecting geotechnical data as part of the George Massey Tunnel Replacement Project. The crane was equipped with a large pile driver, which pounded five piles into the ground to determine the maximum load a single pile can hold in that particular soil. The information will be provided to designers bidding on the contract to...

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What is the RTMC and what makes it Cutting Edge?

June 8, 2016
What is the RTMC and what makes it Cutting Edge?

What is the Regional Transportation Management Centre (RTMC)? Well, for starters, think of it as the nerve centre for road/weather conditions and traffic information across BC. Based in Coquitlam, the RTMC is the hub for collecting transportation information and communicating it to the public, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Your Eyes on the Road The RTMC is equipped with more than 200 live-streaming video feeds, and 600 cameras strategically located on highways across the province (you...

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Woodenhead a Solid Monument to Highway Safety

June 7, 2016
Woodhead on Trans-Canada Hwy

  A man with a wooden stare is watching over the Trans-Canada Highway at Revelstoke, to see if motorists are driving safely. The man, with his unblinking gaze, was once stationed along the Big Bend Highway and now resides in a park, named in his honour. Just who is this man? Why it’s Woodenhead – BC’s highly original roadside attraction that started as a cedar stump! In the 1940s, a large stump was spotted by Peter Fuoco who was...

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How Adopt a Highway Volunteers Are Armed for Weeds War

May 26, 2016
Tackling Invasive Species

We’re battling invasive plants along BC highways, and we’re enlisting Adopt a Highway volunteers to keep these unwelcome intruders from capturing more territory. Adopt a Highway volunteers are our allies in the attack; because they’re on the ground on assigned sections of BC highways. To arm them for managing invasive weeds, we’ve got a new video showing how to spot, report and remove invasive weeds. The pulling weeds part is optional, but for groups that want to jump in...

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Coquihalla Construction Crews: “A Story for Every Kilometre”

May 25, 2016

It took more than 10,000 people 20 months of continuous work to open Phase 1 of the Coquihalla, on May 16, 1986. Many of the men and women who worked on this historic project have moved on to new adventures; however, some still work for the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure. To get a sense of what it was like to work on a project of this scale, we asked four ministry staffers (one retired/three current) four questions. Their...

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Roadside Worker Safety: How Do You Look at It?

May 19, 2016
2 Types of Worksites

People find laws easier to follow when they understand the point, or value, of them. After surveying drivers about roadside worker safety as part of the annual Cone Zone campaign, which runs May to August, we were reminded how important this is to keep in mind. The laws protecting roadside workers cover two types of worksites: Worksites on or beside a road, cordoned off by cones. “Mobile worksites” around vehicles stopped on the roadside with red, blue or amber...

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Construction of the Coquihalla: Still Amazing After 30 Years

May 16, 2016
30th Anniversary Coquihalla Construction-1

It was the most ambitious highway project in the province’s history. It’s the most heavily travelled route in all of British Columbia. From top to bottom, motorists can experience every single type of weather condition known to man. With a summit reaching 1,244 metres tall (imagine almost 3 CN Towers stacked up), it isn’t uncommon for it to be snowing at the peak and sunny at the base. We’re talking, of course about the Coquihalla Highway. The Coquihalla turns...

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