DriveBC Tech

A look at the ministry’s most popular website, DriveBC and the technology we use to keep you safe and moving. .

BC Services Card: Your Care Card and More

new Care Card and BC Driver's License

If you haven’t heard, the old Care Card and Driver’s Licenses are things of the past. As of February 2013 they joined forces to become the BC Services Card. Why the change? Well, the cards haven’t been significantly updated in about 20 years and, over that time, technology has advanced a little (insert sarcasm). The new card is designed to make it safer and easier for you to access health services and other programs that require photo ID. It...

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Three Days in the Life of a Webcam

Webcam DriveBC Yukon Border BCHwy37 Highway37

Most people watch our webcams, to scope out the weather, driving and traffic conditions. But you might spot scenes of nature, beauty and movement. Webcams are versatile like that. Our most northerly webcam on Highway 37, at the border of B.C. and the Yukon, captures some cool views. It was installed last year, at the request of residents of nearby Dease Lake, and is solar powered. At this north-looking setting, border traffic includes moose, caribou and an assortment of...

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Technology: Improving Travel and Highway Safety

Technology: Improving Travel and Highway Safety DriveBC Mobile

Here at TranBC, we love technology, and we’re constantly looking for new ways to make things easier and safer for you to get around. This year saw a lot of interesting developments, and we’ve got a summary of some of the top tech tales of 2012 here for your reading pleasure. Going Mobile DriveBC went mobile in 2011, and it was really well received. So much so that we looked to offer more portable services in 2012. Enter CVSE...

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You Asked: The Top Five DriveBC WebCam Questions

Based on the feedback you send us, you love our webcams, and you depend on them to be informed and travel safely throughout the province. Being so popular, our webcams are also the source for a lot of questions, and we’ve found a lot of people are asking about the same things. So we thought it’d be helpful to quickly cover some of our most common queries. 1. Can you put up more webcams? We’re always looking to add...

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How We Monitor Weather and Highway Conditions

How We Monitor Weather and Highway Conditions

Weather in B.C. can change rapidly, especially in winter. Just take a look at the Coquihalla Highway, where drivers can experience a wide range of weather systems from bottom to top of the mountain pass. And in milder parts of the province, temperatures often hover around freezing, threatening icy conditions. There’s been a lot of discussion lately around how the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure and its maintenance contractors oversee weather fluctuations in our effort to pre-empt hazardous driving...

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Snow, SPICE and Everything Nice(ly) Measured

Since when do snow, sleet, ice and SPICE go together? Just since October, when the Solid Precipitation InterComparison Experiment (SPICE) began at the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure’s Coquihalla summit weather station. This international study is using leading-edge technology to find the best ways to measure what’s known to scientific and weather types as “solid precipitation.” (To most people, that’s sleet, hail or snow – anything other than rain). Coquihalla Summit – the “ideal” challenging site. While measuring solid...

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The Sound of Pedestrian Safety: Audible Signals and Beyond

Chirp-chirp. Cuckoo. You’ve likely heard these sounds while crossing certain intersections in British Columbia. Audible signals, which tell visually-impaired pedestrians when it’s safe to cross a road controlled by traffic lights, are helping set the tone for the province’s routine soundtrack. Watch this video to get a better idea of how audible signals announce pedestrian right-of-ways: Port Alberni received these important enhancements in September. The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure worked with the Canadian National Institute for the Blind...

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How to Make a Transit Bus Jump

How to Make a Transit Bus Jump

Some people are accustomed to “jumping on the bus” – another way to say climbing aboard. But how does something as heavy as a transit bus jump ahead of traffic at a busy intersection? And why would it want to? The reason for jumping ahead of other vehicles is that it helps buses (and transit riders) stay on schedule, and we’ve got a hand in making it happen. It begins with analysis by the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure’s...

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Now Showing: New BC HighwayCams

DriveBC view of Highway 3 at Princeton

A few months ago we did a Tell TranBC survey asking where you’d like to see more BC HighwayCams. We received more than 730 responses and captured the highlights of your suggestions in a blog. Many of your suggestions were identified as “coming soon” and this week we are happy to announce that we recently added eight new cams to our repertoire, a couple of which you might recognize. Sunday Summit, just South of Princeton on Highway 3 (above)has...

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From the Island to the Mainland – A Straight-Up Story About Bridging

From the Island to the Mainland – A Straight-Up Story About Bridging

It’s been raised many times in the past, and it’ll likely continue to be a hot topic as long as Vancouver Island remains separated from the mainland (which will probably be a very long time). I’m talking, of course, about building a connection across the Georgia Straight. The fixed link has been a fixation for us, Islanders and Island visitors for decades. Common suggestions include building a bridge, like Prince Edward Island’s Confederation Bridge, or even a tunnel like...

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